Tripping GFCI….

I had a GFI go out this year in my garage. Lost a freezer full of food from it. It ended up being a $15 fix, just replaced the outlet receptacle.
 
New igniter on the way…. I’ll keep you all posted
Cal1319,
Good to see you’re getting it sorted out. Have you considered using a Kilowatt to see if it is drawing excessive current during start up or the run process? It’s a simple device that you can plug into. I believe they can handle up to 1800W and it can give you a full profile of the current, voltage and wattage, being consumed by a device. This is not a sales pitch and I am not compensated, but as an engineer, I have found it to be one of the simplest and safest ways to determine current overload conditions with a small investment.

Edit: Forgot to suggest you can look for a 30amp socket (they are the one’s that are “upside down” with the ground on top for some city codes) or a non GFI plug to see if that is the problem. I assume you are not using a low end extension cord that is under-rated for this application/grill and are plugged directly into a live socket.
 
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Edit: Forgot to suggest you can look for a 30amp socket (they are the one’s that are “upside down” with the ground on top for some city codes) or a non GFI plug to see if that is the problem. I assume you are not using a low end extension cord that is under-rated for this application/grill and are plugged directly into a live socket.
I recently read about a convention with upside down outlets - it was to signify which outlets in the house were on a switch. Not a rule, not a NEC code - just something apparently a lot of electricians would do.
 
I recently read about a convention with upside down outlets - it was to signify which outlets in the house were on a switch. Not a rule, not a NEC code - just something apparently a lot of electricians would do.
Excellent point. I have also observed that behavior with switched sockets. One distinction may include the 90 degree cutout on the prong of the 20 amp but I don’t think the code requires its use either. Especially during a home rewire.

Edit: Corrected 30 amp with 20amp for accuracy. Thanks Threadcutter!!!
 
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I recently read about a convention with upside down outlets - it was to signify which outlets in the house were on a switch. Not a rule, not a NEC code - just something apparently a lot of electricians would do.
This is also done in commercial applications. Its purpose is to place the ground connection at the top in case something conductive like a paper clip falls on a partially plugged in appliance.
 
Excellent point. I have also observed that behavior with switched sockets. One distinction may include the 90 degree cutout on the prong of the 30 amp but I don’t think the code requires its use either. Especially during a home rewire.
Not trying to be persnickity, but do you perhaps mean a 90 degree cutout on a 20 Amp receptacle ? I'm not aware of ever having seen a 120 Vac Edison plug or receptacle above 20 Amps. Could be wrong though.....
 
Not trying to be persnickity, but do you perhaps mean a 90 degree cutout on a 20 Amp receptacle ? I'm not aware of ever having seen a 120 Vac Edison plug or receptacle above 20 Amps. Could be wrong though.....
You are correct. Sorry for the confusion. I was conflating the 15 (non-slotted) vs 20 (slotted), 110v. Thanks for keeping me on point. Great, and appreciated, correction.
 
@Threadcutter is correct; I don’t think I have ever seen a duplex 30A receptacle. They are usually a single, round, 3- or 4-prong with right-angle neutral.
I installed an international socket on one wall of my “lab” connected to a 30amp circuit (top is international bottom outlet is 30amp-3 pole with 2 horizontals. I used to travel around 9 months out of every year and would purchase electronic equipment from all over the world for testing and fun. My brain pictured that adapter with the plethora of holes in it, but my fingers screwed it all up by not thinking about the the UL approved, US 15 vs. 20amp, 110v which was the focus of my earlier comment. Thanks for catching my error.
 
I installed an international socket on one wall of my “lab” connected to a 30amp circuit (top is international bottom outlet is 30amp-3 pole with 2 horizontals. I used to travel around 9 months out of every year and would purchase electronic equipment from all over the world for testing and fun. My brain pictured that adapter with the plethora of holes in it, but my fingers screwed it all up by not thinking about the the UL approved, US 15 vs. 20amp, 110v which was the focus of my earlier comment. Thanks for catching my error.
Yeah, I wasn't entirely sure. In this day and age, it seems like anything is possible.
 

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