Soaking brisket in its own juices.

epcotisbest

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So today I did a brisket. 220 to internal temp of 155 then wrapped in foil to 198. Then rested in the oven wrapped in towels for a couple of hours before slicing.
I pierced the foil and drained juices in a pan and put the sliced brisket in the juices to soak for about 30 minutes before serving.
Very good, tender and extra moist, but this particular brisket was extra fatty, as you can see. Still, it was extra tasty too.

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Roaniecowpony

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Looks great!

I have a bbq cookbook somewhere, where the author whips up his own juices (au jus) for his competition brisket, out of drippings, beef broth, rub, etc.. I have incorporated his technique into both, my brisket and tri-tip. It makes it so much more enjoyable, especially for reheating, when brisket can get dry.
 

SmokeZilla

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Your cook looks good. One thing I noticed was you may have pulled and wrapped before you actually cleared the stall that occurs somewhere between 165-170F. When wrapped early you will certainly get more juices as the fat and connective tissues have not had adequate time to render (which can take up to 4 hours to complete depending on the size of the brisket at the temperature you stated) and get reabsorbed into the meat itself. The good thing is that most Beef Brisket, Chuck Roast, and Rounds, can take a lot of abuse and can be served anywhere from about 145F and beyond safely. Your tenderness may vary. I have also experienced Standing Ribeye Roasts (with and without bones) that can be pulled over a wide range of temperatures. The true test of success will always be the number of smiling faces that consumed the end product.
 

Plumberguy

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Your cook looks good. One thing I noticed was you may have pulled and wrapped before you actually cleared the stall that occurs somewhere between 165-170F. When wrapped early you will certainly get more juices as the fat and connective tissues have not had adequate time to render (which can take up to 4 hours to complete depending on the size of the brisket at the temperature you stated) and get reabsorbed into the meat itself. The good thing is that most Beef Brisket, Chuck Roast, and Rounds, can take a lot of abuse and can be served anywhere from about 145F and beyond safely. Your tenderness may vary. I have also experienced Standing Ribeye Roasts (with and without bones) that can be pulled over a wide range of temperatures. The true test of success will always be the number of smiling faces that consumed the end product.
I am a novice and learning. I have done two prime briskets, the first I wrapped at about 153, and the second around 161, pulled both at about 200. The first was more moist in the flat.

What temp do you wrap @?
 

SmokeZilla

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I challenge your “novice” claim. Your technique and results show you are several levels above “novice” and I am sure will be a contender for grand champion if you continue to apply your technique. As stated by CK above, the formation of a nice bark is a factor and personally, can ”sell the look of a good brisket” especially in competition. I typically look for a good sometimes dark bark that is firm to the touch. However, I tend to wrap after I clear the stall (usually between 168 and 170) after I see the temperature rise about 5F above 165F. I have heard of briskets that complete the stall early (usually leaner cuts) in less than 2.5 hours and have witnessed a stall that took 7 hours on one of my cooks that was 30 fat/marbling. I use the temperature change because my experience shows it is an indicator that the internal connective tissues and fat have finally broken down (rendered) and “boiled out most of the fats. There are several camps that have formed on when to pull and wrap though. On one side, people pull early (as you did) and apply the Texas Crutch) wrapping and finishing the cook at between 192-204, or when probe tender) because they want to speed up the cook and feel the protein has absorbed as much smoke as possible in the first 4-5 hours. This camp is also the one that uses an oven or propane grill for the final part of their cook because it is more cost effective. Not me!!! Bring on the pellet expense, I’ll figure out the details later. Another camp does the entire cook unwrapped and feel that is the true “Texas” way to cook brisket because the cowboys didn’t have access to peach paper or aluminum foil. I have done a lot of briskets using different grills, firepits and smokers, so I tend to wait until I know I have cleared the stall and then I use the Texas Crutch. I readily admit I plan my cooks to allow at least 17 hours total cook time then an added 3-5 hours rest and serve when the temp hits around 140F. But, my technique may not be the most popular. I also use a wooden skewer to check tenderness when I think the temperature is proper for removing the brisket to make sure it is soft and ready for resting. As a budding pitmaster, you have to go with what you think is best for your situation and the device(s) you are using. Another important thing to consider is the quality of the beef you are buying and the size of the brisket you are cooking. I typically use whole packers (flat and point together with a backyard trim for maximum meat yield) and I like them to be between 9-12 pounds always calculating 1.25 hours per pound (including minimal rest time). Just my thoughts, Cook On!!!
 

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